Youth Camp – Lions 103 CS http://lions103cs.org/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 19:31:58 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://lions103cs.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/lions-103-cs-icon-150x150.png Youth Camp – Lions 103 CS http://lions103cs.org/ 32 32 William F. Dixon https://lions103cs.org/william-f-dixon/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 18:35:11 +0000 https://lions103cs.org/william-f-dixon/

Fairlea-William F. “Lindburgh” Dixon, 94, passed away with his children by his side on Thursday, December 30, 2021.

Bill was born November 18, 1927 in Sunlight, WV, to the late Arthur G. and Mary Virginia Bare Dixon.

In addition to his parents, Bill was predeceased by his wife, Mary Jo Gee Dixon; a young son, William Earl; two brothers, Junior and Laddie Dixon; five sisters, BC Gwinn, Sally Lee Omdstead, Lola Ray Viers, Lawanda Viers and Mary Virginia Reynolds.

Bill graduated from the Williamsburg High School class of 1943. He served in the US Navy from 1945 to 1947, graduated from the Frame Refrigeration & Electrical Institute, and married the love of his life, Mary Jo Gee, on the 27th. May 1950. He moved to Fairlea in 1951 and founded Dixon Refrigeration and Heating. He was a Lennox dealer, had been a member of the Fairlea Ruritan Club for 50 years, Little League coach and Boy Scout leader. He was a member of the Fairlea Fire and Rescue Service, a founding member of the Greenbrier East Booster Club and a member of the Greenbrier County Farm Bureau for 40 years. He helped build the Greenbrier County Youth Camp and served as a principal for 30 years.

Bill was a 50 year old member of Greenbrier Lodge # 42 AF&AM. He attended Trinity United Methodist Church in Ronceverte for many years. He loved the outdoors, especially trout fishing in Yellowstone National Park. In 1985, he won a Big Buck competition in West Virginia.

Survivors include her son, Michael W. Dixon (Susan) of Caldwell; daughter, Brenda Dixon Gabbert of Alderson; daughter, Ginger Dixon Morgan (Rodney) of Lewisburg; four grandsons, Trent (Kerry) Gabbert, Aaron Gabbert (Jenna), Neil Dixon (Gabrielle) and Dr Scott Dixon (Dr Jordan); three granddaughters, Lindsey Gabbert Flach (Michael), Kinsey Morgan (Eric) and Kourtney Morgan; nine great-grandsons, Henry, William, John and Sam Gabbert, Cameron Gabbert, Michael D. Flach, Rhett and Wells Dixon, Emmett Dixon and one great-grandson en route; four great-granddaughters: Ainsley and Caroline Flach, Delaney Gabbert and Josie Schroder; two sisters, Edna Cochran and Sally Blankenship; two brothers, Frank Dixon and Sam Bare; two sisters-in-law, Christina Dixon and Bonnie Cooper Gee. He is also survived by many cousins ​​and friends.

We can honestly say that Dad lived a life we ​​all wish we had. He was loved by his great-grandchildren, grandchildren and children, and just about everyone he touched. If you were lucky enough to be bullied, he liked you. Otherwise, he wasn’t afraid to let you know. For 93 years, he did just about anything he wanted to do with a big family and many good friends.

The funeral was held on Monday January 3 at Trinity United Methodist Church in Ronceverte where Pastor Joe Geiger served. Military honors were bestowed by the Honor Guard at Post 26 of the American Legion.

The visit took place at the church before the service.

In lieu of flowers, the family is asking for donations to be made to Trinity United Methodist Church, Building Fund, 373 Pocahontas Ave. Ronceverte WV 24970.

Wallace & Wallace Funeral Home in Lewisburg is in charge of the arrangements.

Please send your condolences online by visiting www.WallaceandWallaceFH.com.

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Over 1,000 toys distributed to children at Parkway Gardens https://lions103cs.org/over-1000-toys-distributed-to-children-at-parkway-gardens/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 14:35:34 +0000 https://lions103cs.org/over-1000-toys-distributed-to-children-at-parkway-gardens/

Residents of Parkway Gardens marked the holidays with a Winter Wonderland experience and freebies for all residents 18 and under on Saturday, December 11. Related Midwest and Related Affordable have teamed up with Chi Gives Back to deliver toys to kids. More than 500 residents enjoyed individually wrapped cookies, games, holiday music and a photo op with Santa on Saturday in a heated tent at Parkway Gardens. Residents 18 and under received a toy or gift card. Guests were invited to enjoy a hot drink at the Future Ties Hot Chocolate Station and join Project HOOD to create a greeting card using their photo with Santa Claus.

© 2021 Nicee Martin Photo & Design LLC | www.niceemartin.com

“Every family should feel the holiday spirit this time of year,” said Curt Bailey, president of Related Midwest. “Being able to do something special for our residents is something the Related team looks forward to every year, especially after the events of 2020 have pulled us apart. We are so happy that we were able to create a winter wonderland for families and children at Parkway Gardens.

“We congratulate the Related Midwest and Related Affordable teams for their leadership on behalf of the families of Parkway Gardens,” said Kouri Marshall, Co-Founder of ChiGivesBack. “It was a joy to celebrate, to share the joy of Christmas and to see the enthusiasm of the children as they selected their gifts.”

Power 92’s HotRod played festive tunes throughout the event as attendees danced and participated in a 360-degree photo booth, limbo, and other games. Related volunteers and Chi Gives Back helped the children choose their gifts and gave out treats. Residents were encouraged to bring home a photo with Santa Claus to remember the day as well as a holiday cookie or cake pop. Kids received face paint and decorated greeting cards, and guests enjoyed the food at Harold’s Chicken Shack. The outdoor setting and additional protective measures provided space for residents to safely attend during the pandemic.

Future Ties, which offers mentoring programs, summer camps and after-school activities onsite at Parkway Gardens, handed out free hats, gloves and scarves during the event so residents can stay warm this winter.

“This season we are proud to bring warmth, light and fun to Parkway Gardens,” said Jennifer Maddox, Executive Director of Future Ties. “More than ever, it is time to think about how we can give back to our neighbors and especially to our children.

Rainbow PUSH participated in the event by offering free turkeys to residents. The Related Midwest continues to make permanent improvements to the Parkway Gardens capital and host events for residents. Winter Wonderland follows a series of resident events hosted by Related, including a summer ice cream, a back-to-school event with free school supplies and groceries, and the unveiling of a series of murals created by teenagers from Parkway Gardens in partnership with After School Matters and artist Erick “Roho” Garcia. The Related Affordable Foundation continues to seek scholarship applications for residents of Parkway Gardens attending high school, including colleges and trade schools.

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Keith Fredrich Lillich https://lions103cs.org/keith-fredrich-lillich/ Mon, 03 Jan 2022 16:24:13 +0000 https://lions103cs.org/keith-fredrich-lillich/

Keith Fredrich Lillich, 76, of Colorado Springs, CO, passed away on Christmas Eve, December 24, 2021, surrounded by his family.

Keith was born to Herman and Marie (Stutheit) Lillich on September 27, 1945 in Bird City, KS. Keith graduated as a valedictorian in 1963 and graduated from the University of Kansas with a bachelor’s degree in metallurgical engineering in 1968.

While at KU, Keith met Jo Ann (Bedford) and their friendship turned into marriage at Danforth Chapel on the KU campus on June 9, 1968. After their marriage he worked as an engineer before that the allure of western Kansas and family farm life be discovered. the couple returned in 1972 to Goodland, KS. Keith helped his stepfather with farming / ranching south of Goodland in what was called Shalom Valley in 1980. In 1980 they were lucky enough to have a son,

Colter and in 1982 another blessing, a daughter, Carol. Keith was an active member of the Emmanuel Lutheran Church and enjoyed the choir, council and youth club, especially the summer for the youth of Shalom Valley. After farming, Keith worked at Golden West Skills as a case manager until he moved in 2000 to Colorado Springs where he continued to work as a case manager at The Resource Exchange where he worked. retired in 2012.

His parents, his sister Carolyn Lillich and his brother Eugene Lillich, predeceased Keith in death.

Survived by his beloved wife Jo Ann of Colorado Springs, his children Colter Lillich of Colorado Springs, Carol (Noah) Zepelin, Centennial, CO, and his granddaughter Talia Zepelin, his older brother, Gerald Lillich of Colorado Springs and several nieces and nephews.

Memorial services will be held on January 10, 2022 at 10:30 a.m. MT at Koons-Russell Funeral Home with the interment of Keith’s ashes in Goodland Cemetery.

Memorials, in lieu of flowers, can be attributed to Colorado Parkinson’s Foundation Inc, Emmanuel Lutheran Church of Goodland, the Humane Society of the Pikes Peak area, and Sky Ranch Youth Camp. These can be left at services or mailed to Koons-Russell Funeral Home, 211 N. Main Ave., Goodland, KS 67735.

Online condolences for the family can be left at www.koonsfuneralhome.com.

Services were entrusted to Koons-Russell Funeral Home in Goodland.

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William Dixon Obituary (1927 – 2021) – White Sulfur Springs, WV https://lions103cs.org/william-dixon-obituary-1927-2021-white-sulfur-springs-wv/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 22:24:32 +0000 https://lions103cs.org/william-dixon-obituary-1927-2021-white-sulfur-springs-wv/

William F. “Lindburgh” Dixon, 94, of Fairlea died with his children by his side on December 30, 2021.
Bill was born November 18, 1927 in Sunlight, WV, to the late Arthur G. and Mary Virginia Bare Dixon.
In addition to his parents, Bill was predeceased by his wife Mary Jo Gee Dixon; a young son, William Earl; two brothers, Junior and Laddie Dixon; five sisters, BC Gwinn, Sally Lee Omdstead, Lola Ray Viers, Lawanda Viers and Mary Virginia Reynolds.
Bill graduated from the Williamsburg High School class of 1943. He served in the US Navy from 1945 to 1947, graduated from the Frame Refrigeration & Electrical Institute, and married the love of his life, Mary Jo Gee, on the 27th. May 1950. He moved to Fairlea in 1951 and founded Dixon Refrigeration and Heating. He was a Lennox dealer, a 50-year Fairlea Ruritan Club member, Little League coach and Boy Scout leader. He was a member of the Fairlea Fire and Rescue Service, a founding member of the Greenbrier East Booster Club and a member of the Greenbrier County Farm Bureau for 40 years. He helped build the Greenbrier County Youth Camp and served as a principal for 30 years.
Bill was a 50 year old member of Greenbrier Lodge # 42 AF&AM. He attended Trinity United Methodist Church in Ronceverte for many years. He loved the outdoors, especially trout fishing in Yellowstone National Park. In 1985, he won a Big Buck competition in West Virginia.
Survivors include her son, Michael W. Dixon (Susan) of Caldwell; her daughter, Brenda Dixon Gabbert of Alderson, her daughter, Ginger Dixon Morgan (Rodney) of Lewisburg; 4 grandsons, Trent (Kerry) Gabbert, Aaron Gabbert (Jenna), Neil Dixon (Gabriella), Dr Scott Dixon (Dr Jordan); 3 granddaughters, Lindsey Gabbert Flach (Michael), Kinsey Morgan Schroder (Eric) and Kourtney Morgan; 9 great-grandsons, Henry, William, John and Sam Gabbert, Cameron Gabbert, Michael D. Flach, Rhett and Wells Dixon, Emmett Dixon, and a great-grandson en route; 4 great-granddaughters: Ainsley and Caroline Flach, Delaney Gabbert and Josie Schroder; 2 sisters, Edna Cochran and Sally Blankenship; 2 brothers, Frank Dixon and Sam Bare; 2 sisters-in-law, Christina Dixon and Bonnie Cooper Gee. He is also survived by many cousins ​​and friends.
We can honestly say that Dad lived a life we ​​all wish we had. He was loved by his great-grandchildren, grandchildren and children, and just about everyone he touched. If you were lucky enough to be bullied, he liked you. Otherwise, he wasn’t afraid to let you know. For 93 years, he did just about anything he wanted to do with a big family and many good friends.
The funeral will be at 12:00 p.m. on Monday, January 3, 2022 at Trinity United Methodist Church in Ronceverte with Pastor Joe Geiger officiating and military honors led by the Honor Guard from US Legion Station 26.
Visits will take place from 11:00 p.m. to 12:00 p.m. Covid restrictions apply.
In lieu of flowers, the family is asking for donations to be made to: Trinity United Methodist Church Building Fund, 373 Pocahontas Ave. Ronceverte WV 24970.
To plant a beautiful memorial tree in memory of William F. “Lindburgh” Dixon, please visit our tribute store.

Posted by Wallace & Wallace Inc Funeral Chapels & Crematory – Ronceverte on January 1, 2022.

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Business of the week: Woodson YMCA https://lions103cs.org/business-of-the-week-woodson-ymca/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 06:01:00 +0000 https://lions103cs.org/business-of-the-week-woodson-ymca/

Pilot and review of Wausau

Editor’s Note: Company of the week is a sponsored article that shares the stories of locally owned and operated businesses in the Wausau area, highlighting the products and services they offer and how they contribute to the unique flavor of the metropolitan area. Learn how to present your business by emailing christina@wausaupilotandreview.com.

This week’s flagship company is the Woodson YMCA, a 130-year-old Wausau institution. The organization dates back to 1891, about half a century after the birth of the world’s first YMCA in England “for the betterment of the human condition”. Around this time, a YMCA was started in Wausau at CJ Winton’s home, according to the organization’s history page. The first YMCA building was constructed in 1893 and had 267 members. Wausau quickly overtook this space and in 1907 much of the current YMCA site was purchased. Major changes occurred again in 1962 with a new taller building and a change in the constitution of the YMCA which allowed women and girls to also be members, paving the way for the organization to become the YMCA centric. about the family she is today. Through all of its decades of growth, advancement and expansion, the YMCA of Wausau has always been “an organization for everyone”, regardless of economic status, thanks to its generous scholarship program. The Woodson YMCA-Aspirus branch opened in Weston in 2005, and the most recent effort to transform the downtown facility began in 2019. These robust plans have provided more classrooms to meet the needs. growing community in childcare, launched an activity center for seniors – The Landing – and expanded a thriving gymnastics program. Today, with the YMCA’s flagship facility in downtown Wausau, the Aspirus YMCA branch in Weston, and satellite programs in Mosinee, the Woodson YMCA continues to have a positive influence on people’s lives. Woodson YMCA CEO Bryan Bailey, who has been with the organization for 28 years, said the Y has a strong team of administrators, staff and volunteers who share a common goal: to improve the community. “We have a very positive culture at the Y,” Bailey said. “It’s a great place to work and belong. Here is what he had to say about the Woodson YMCA, its programs and its future in Wausau.


Q: When was the YMCA created?

A: The Woodson YMCA is a 501c3 non-profit organization that was first established in the Wausau area in 1881. Over the past 130 years, it has continued to grow and serve the needs of our community.

Q: What services do you offer?

A: The YMCA has three main areas of focus: youth development, healthy lifestyles, and social responsibility. There is something for everyone at all ages. We offer a wide range of group exercise classes in large studios, in the water and online. Our exercise equipment is state-of-the-art, making it easy to watch your favorite shows or navigate the Grand Canyon on a treadmill. The new indoor glass walking track offers panoramic views of Wausau, highlighting the historic downtown district and new modern buildings near the Riverwalk. Our sports complex, gymnastics studio, ball fields and summer camps all support our youth programs which help provide a safe place for children to play and build confidence. We have mini-daycares for small children, giving parents the chance to join a class or workout. Several pools offer swimming lessons and water safety techniques for children. The Landing serves our 55+ community with a place to connect, exercise and socialize.

Q: What makes the YMCA unique and what sets you apart from other establishments?

A: The Y is not just a gymnasium, it is a community center. One of the greatest needs of our community was child care for infants and toddlers. Our expansion has allowed us to almost double the number of families we serve. Our daycares provide much-needed care at our two sites in Wausau and Weston. The dedication of our teachers and staff is incredible, our daycares never closed during the pandemic.

Q: What are you most proud of?

A: We are very proud of our community supported membership program. We never turn down someone who cannot afford to subscribe. We raise funds every year to help anyone who wants to join the YMCA to be able to do so. Donating to the Community Partners Campaign gives children, seniors and families the opportunity to be part of the Y community.

Q: How have you changed and evolved over time? What is different now from the opening of the YMCA?

A: The Woodson YMCA has embarked on a $ 25 million expansion project to better serve our community with a larger daycare facility as well as to expand all aspects of our building and the programs we offer. We have partnered with Aspirus to create a health and wellness campus in downtown Wausau. The Davis Foundation enabled the Y to create The Landing and meet the needs of our 55+ communities.

Q: What challenges did you have to overcome?

A: The three-month closure in 2020 has been difficult because the Y is a place to come together and connect. Our community needs us and we need them. The expansion happened just at the right time. This created an opportunity for people to come back to a larger YMCA with plenty of space to feel safe and healthy.

Q: Where do you see the YMCA heading in the future?

A: The Woodson YMCA has two main branches at our Wausau and Aspirus sites, The Landing for our 55+ community, as well as our Sturtevant summer camp, which has over 3,000 children each summer. Our hopes and dreams for the future are to continue supporting our community by providing a safe and healthy place where everyone can belong and feel connected. It’s a beautiful day at the Y!

Connect with the YMCA Woodson

Visit the Woodson YMCA online here. For more information on membership, click here. For class, gymnasium and swimming pool times, click here.

Wausau branch

  • 707 Third Street, Wausau
  • 715-845-2177

Aspire branch

  • 3402 Howland Ave, Weston
  • 715-841-1850

Mosinee satellite

  • 700 High St., Mosinee
  • 715-693-2550 x 3441
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Support national parks in 2021 https://lions103cs.org/support-national-parks-in-2021/ Wed, 29 Dec 2021 15:18:00 +0000 https://lions103cs.org/support-national-parks-in-2021/

WASHINGTON, December 29, 2021 / PRNewswire / – As we enter the final days of the year, the National Park Foundation (NPF) reflects on how it has supported national parks throughout 2021. Thanks to a growing community of champions of the parks, including donors, foundations, corporate partners, National Park Service (NPS) staff, philanthropic organizations (often referred to as groups of friends), volunteers, visitors and more, we’ve accomplished a lot together for national parks.

We hope this summary of some of the highlights of the NPF in 2021 will inspire you to connect with and support national parks in 2022:

Protected wildlife and natural resources
NPF has helped take care of the magnificent species and ecosystems that reside in national parks.

For example, with the help of the NPF, Redwood National and State Parks is restoring land adjacent to Prairie Creek, which has been invaded by invasive species such as reed canarygrass. A multi-year project in partnership with Save the Redwoods League and the Arbor Day Foundation will plant native species along the site’s floodplains, including Sitka Spruce, Coastal Redwood, Bigleaf Maple, Branched Willow, red alder and black poplar. Restoring native vegetation will enhance tributaries that support species like salmon and rainbow trout.

At Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve, NPF continued to support a project that helps rebuild populations of Rio Grande cutthroat trout in streams and lakes at the site. FNP funding will also help the park manage its elk population, monitor its amphibians and plants, and determine the health of various ecosystems.

Preserved history and culture
NPF has helped preserve and restore sites that commemorate pivotal moments in our country’s history.

For example, NPF continued to support the restoration of the homes where Dr King was born and where he and Coretta Scott King raised their families and started the civil rights movement. NPF funding helps preserve the integrity of buildings and artefacts inside as part of Martin Luther King jr. National historical park. The project helps ensure future visitors get a glimpse into the life and legacy of Dr King and Coretta Scott King. These efforts were made possible by NPF’s African American Experience Fund, which celebrated its 20e anniversary in 2021 and helps connect everyone to the role of African Americans in U.S. history through national parks.

Students Connected to the Power of Parks as Classrooms
NPF’s Open OutDoors for Kids field trip program has continued to evolve to meet the changing needs of students and teachers. In 2021, NPF provided funding to help educators adjust to the new expectations of distance learning, so that students can access parks as classrooms, whether it is an in-person, virtual tour. or hybrid.

These grants support the specific needs of each park site and its educational partners, with particular emphasis on developing students’ social and emotional learning. This year’s hybrid programs included the Cumberland Island National Seashore Virtual Nature Exploration Summer Camp and the Timucuan Ecological and Historical Reserve Salt Marsh Superhero Program, which uses videos, discussions , virtual field trips, research and student observations to teach NPS “superheroes”.

NPF’s support for NPS’s Junior Ranger Angler program inspires children to catch their first fish in nearly 200 parks that allow recreational fishing. As part of the program, Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site hosted a day camp that taught participants modern fishing techniques, as well as the traditional fishing methods of the Hidatsa people, who lived in villages. lodge in earth on this land for almost 500 years.

Invested in the next generation of park stewards
The NPF continued to provide financial support to service corps programs in national parks across the country. The service corps projects ranged from the elimination of invasive species to historic preservation to the restoration of trails. These service corps programs also provide on-the-job training to members and inspire belonging, allowing people to develop fellowship, learn new skills and learn about careers on public lands.

For example, the NPF funded a pilot program of all-female firefighters in Grand Teton and Yosemite National Parks in Wyoming and California, respectively. The teams focused on fuel management (for example, planned prescribed burns and other treatments that modify or reduce natural fuels and therefore decrease the risk of severe forest fires for local communities and help maintain healthy park ecosystems) and fire response. This pilot program helps NPS increase diversity in its forest firefighting workforce.

The NPF Latin Heritage Fund, which celebrated its 10e anniversary throughout 2021, collaborated with the NPS, Mission Heritage Partners and the Texas Conservation Corps of American YouthWorks on the Cultural Landscape Apprentice program at San Antonio Missions National Historical Park. This program connects local Hispanic and Latino young adults with opportunities to learn about cultural landscape management alongside NPS employees.

Improved visitor experience
NPF has ensured that NPS is equipped to accommodate an increasing number of visitors and provide people of all skill levels with a memorable experience.

For example, NPF continued to provide support for major upgrades to the lower level of the Thomas jefferson Memorial, including the installation of accessible and state-of-the-art exhibits that incorporate both tactile and sound elements. These updates help ensure that all visitors can learn more about that of Thomas Jefferson multi-faceted story.

NPF, Friends of the Smokies, and the Great Smoky Mountains National Park celebrated the completion of a new trail that allows visitors of all skill levels to access any of the Cades cove the most popular historic homes, the John Oliver Cabin. The half-mile paved trail is approximately eight feet wide to provide ample room for wheelchairs or other mobility devices to pass each other. NPF and the Friends of the Smokies funded the project.

Building strong partnerships
NPF continued to invest in philanthropic park partners, also known as Friends Groups, who raise funds, implement volunteer programs, develop connections with neighboring communities, and more. These partners consist of organizations of all sizes and include site partners that preserve battlefields, rivers and trails, and heritage areas.

For example, NPF’s Strong Parks, Strong Communities initiative helped build the capacity of 36 of these groups to serve their NPS partners. FNP provided on $ 670,000 in grants to help these groups undertake projects such as redesigning their websites, developing new education or volunteer programs, improving accessibility in their partner parks, and much more.

Learn more here on how the FPN works with partners to protect and enhance national parks for present and future generations.

ABOUT THE NATIONAL PARK FOUNDATION
The National Park Foundation works to protect wildlife and park lands, preserve history and culture, educate and engage young people, and connect people around the world to the wonders of parks. We do this in collaboration with the National Park Service, the community of park partners, and with the generous support of donors, without whom our work would not be possible. Learn more at nationalparks.org.

SOURCE National Park Foundation

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The Bristol Press – Teams have been chosen for the annual Sloper Plunge, which raises funds so families in need can send children to camp https://lions103cs.org/the-bristol-press-teams-have-been-chosen-for-the-annual-sloper-plunge-which-raises-funds-so-families-in-need-can-send-children-to-camp/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 19:02:11 +0000 https://lions103cs.org/the-bristol-press-teams-have-been-chosen-for-the-annual-sloper-plunge-which-raises-funds-so-families-in-need-can-send-children-to-camp/ SOUTHINGTON – Teams are forming for the 17th annual Sloper Plunge, which will see groups jump into the cold waters of Sloper Pond. The event raises funds so families in need can send their children to Camp Sloper this summer.

The Sloper Plunge will be held on Saturday February 26 at 1 pm at the Camp Sloper YMCA at 1000 East St. This year, the Southington-Cheshire Community YMCA is hoping to raise $ 80,000 to provide financial assistance to families wishing to send their children to camp. Slope.

Mark Pooler, CEO of the Southington-Cheshire Community YMCA, said it was his favorite time of year due to the “big buzz” around Sloper Plunge.

Last year, Sloper Plunge was held without spectators or teams jumping 30 minutes apart due to covid-19 restrictions at the time. This year, spectators will be back.

“The past year has been great, but we missed the fans cheering on the people and the feeling of community as the teams cheer each other up when they come out of the water,” Pooler said. “We plan to pick it up in person this year and will continue to monitor and see where things end. Hopefully we can all safely gather outside with protocols in place to keep people safe. ”

Pooler said the Sloper Plunge always receives “wonderful” community support.

“Everyone seems to really come together with the cause of sending children to camp, especially after the past two years and the challenges for children with the pandemic,” he said.

Justin Hubeny, director of the outdoor center at YMCA Camp Sloper, said Sloper Plunge is a “grassroots” fundraiser in town, which plays “a huge role in sending kids to day camp during summer.

“All children deserve the opportunity to experience the magic of summer camp. The Sloper Plunge gives children the opportunity to come to camp who otherwise would not be able to afford it, ”he said.

People can find a list of teams they can support at sccymca.org/sloperplunge. This year, 13 teams are participating.

A new team this year is “Team Brian – Making it Happen”, which was created in memory of former Education Council Chairman Brian Goralski, who died on September 2 following a battle with cancer. The team is chaired by Brian Goralski’s wife, Cathy Goralski, and children Andrew and Jessica.

“Everyone who knew Brian knew that his personal, civic and professional life was primarily centered around children and young people,” said Cathy Goralski. “They all know Brian has always been ‘hard’. Our team’s hope is that donors emulate the spirit of these two values, not only to honor Brian’s legacy, but more importantly to donate generously to this incredible community effort that helps send children to camp.

Other participating teams include the Southington YMCA and Cheshire YMCA, Southington Police and Fire, Southington Public Schools and Cheshire Public Schools, Southington Politicians and Cheshire Politicians, Southington High School Football, Team Lake Compounce, Leaping Ladies and Hartford HealthCare.

Those interested in joining a Southington team can email Pooler at mpooler@sccymca.org. He can then connect people to the team or captain of their choice. To join a Cheshire team, email Doug Levens at dlevens@sccymca.org. Participants must be 18 years old, know how to swim and collect $ 100 in donations.

This year’s Sloper Plunge is sponsored by title sponsor Maximum Sound & Security as well as East Coast Mechanical, Inc., All Waste and The Fire Place.

“The Sloper Plunge is one of my favorite events in Southington,” said Ralph Campochairo, owner of sponsor Maximum Sound & Security. “It’s a great cause and what could be better than helping children and families in need. I chose to support the event because I know the YMCA is doing good things for our community.

The YMCA is currently seeking additional sponsors. For more information on sponsorship, email Julie Gianesini at jgianesini@sccymca.org.

To donate in support of Sloper Plunge, visit sccymca.org/sloperplunge or send a check payable to Southington Community YMCA to: Southington Community YMCA Attn: Julie Gianesini 29 High St. Southington, CT 06489. Those who send checks are requested to note “Sloper Plunge” in the memo field.

Brian M. Johnson can be reached at 860-973-1806 or bjohnson@bristolpress.com.

Posted in The Bristol Press, Southington Herald on Monday, December 27, 2021 2:00 PM. Update: Monday, December 27, 2021 2:02 p.m.
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Queensland COVID case today: Residents warned to prepare for ‘significantly higher’ numbers after more than 700 infections on Sunday https://lions103cs.org/queensland-covid-case-today-residents-warned-to-prepare-for-significantly-higher-numbers-after-more-than-700-infections-on-sunday/ Sun, 26 Dec 2021 01:03:19 +0000 https://lions103cs.org/queensland-covid-case-today-residents-warned-to-prepare-for-significantly-higher-numbers-after-more-than-700-infections-on-sunday/

Queensland has detected 714 new cases of COVID-19 as authorities warn more infections will be diagnosed in the coming days.

Chief Health Officer John Gerrard said the drop in the number of cases from the previous day follows a lull in testing on Christmas Day.

In the video above, an Australian comedian collapses over his own diagnosis of COVID-19.

“So it won’t surprise us at all if, in the next few days, the numbers increase dramatically,” Dr Gerrard said.

“We wouldn’t care too much, it wouldn’t be a surprise.”